Shot Pattern Pie Chart

golf_green_pie_chart

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So in the classic game, I think of Curtis Strange vs Mac O Grady. Most would argue that Mac was the superior ball striker, but Strange wins back to back US Opens. Personally watching Mac during his prime, I was surprised how often he would miss long and left. Not necessarily over the green left (very bad), but having to putt downhill and left to right. I can only speculate that this might have contributed to Mac putting left handed. However, putting uphill is going to be better odds than putting downhill,and right to left putts are going to be a more comfortable putting stance for right handed golfers. Left handed golfers would just flip the pie chart horizontally.

I’d rather be the purple, even though short is often better than long. The purple golfer could adjust and aim a bit short of the pin to manage their tendencies.
Mac is always an interesting case. People who saw him rave about how he hit it, but his stats aren’t impressive at all. Some disconnect when he went to a tournament.

This isn’t about adjusting… it’s about the design of the golf swing and equipment. This is about where the golfer is actually trying to hit the ball, but their swing faults leave them skewed one way or the other. Mac was a great range hitter, but on the course missed long and left way too often. It was due to the mechanics of his swing. The right arm straightening on the downswing sometimes didn’t work as well as planned. This very slight OTT would also de loft the club slightly… so his miss was long and left. To complicate that, he was putting left handed (maybe why?) so his best leave would be short and left… for a right handed golfer, not many ways to make that your miss… because left, pulls or OTT also deloft the clubface…

If Mac’s leave on a good day was in fact short and right… he would be putting left handed up the hill which is not going to be as comfortable when the ball is breaking away from you.